Buddha developed a profound and detailed, universal theory of unity, which accounts for everything related to mind and consciousness. The Buddha obtained his deep insights by means of mental techniques and training. Using his own mind as both research equipment and research object, his approach was at least as empirical - i.e. verifiable by experience or experiment - as that of modern physics.

Contemporary, mainstream quantum physics and cosmology in unison are close at what is dubbed a "Grand Unification Theory" which supposedly explains all phenomena and is based on empirical evidences gathered in a handful of High-Energy Physics Laboratories. Well, rather, they were close at it by the end of the 20.th century whereafter the quest for a unified theory, prevalent in main-stream physics for most of the 20'th century, seems to have dissolved into a plethora of theoretical speculations, which seem to have in common that they are un-verifiable by experience or experiment and thus are neither empirical nor scientific.

The great stumbling block for modern physics is that at the very experimental frontiers, where experiments are conducted under extreme conditions, it has been verified that the behavior of matter / energy / fields at the very smallest observable scales, ponderable in the labs, depends on how it is being observed. It is exactly here the teachings of the Buddha can come in handy. Buddha came to the same conclusions about the physical reality on the very smallest scales as modern physics. However, Buddha didn't need any multi billion dollar high-energy physics laboratory and tremendous amounts of explosive energy to make his discoveries - the shade of a tree, a pillow and a properly trained mind is all that it takes.

Regards, Project Buddha Society.


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Excerpt from:

Mindfulness In Plain English

by Mahathera Henepola Gunaratana

There you are, and you suddenly realize that you are spending your whole life just barely getting by. You keep up a good front. You manage to make ends meed somehow and look OK from the outside. But those periods of desperation, those times when you feel everything caving in on you, you keep those to yourself. You are a mess. And you know it. But you hide it beautifully. Meanwhile, way down under all that you just know there has got be some other way to live, some better way to look at the world, some way to touch life more fully. You click into it by chance now and then. You get a good job. You fall in love. You win the game. and for a while, things are different. Life takes on a richness and clarity that makes all the bad times and humdrum fade away. The whole texture of your experience changes and you say to yourself, "OK, now I've made it; now I will be happy". But then that fades, too, like smoke in the wind. You are left with just a memory. nThat and a vague awareness that something is wrong.

Read more from Mindfulness In Plain English

Books for Sale

What the Buddha Taught: Revised and Expanded Edition with Texts from Suttas and DhammapadaWhat the Buddha Taught: Revised and Expanded Edition with Texts from Suttas and Dhammapada by Walpola Rahula.
This indispensable volume is a lucid and faithful account of the Buddha's teachings. Dr. Rahula's What the Buddha Taught provides a simple and reliable introduction to the complexities of the subject as only could be done by one having a firm grasp of the vast material to be sifted. Authoritative and clear, logical and sober, this study is as comprehensive as it is masterly. This edition contains a selection of illustrative texts from the Suttas and the Dhammapada (specially translated by the author).
Handbook For MankindHandbook For Mankind by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.
These lectures were originally presented in 1956. From the foreword by Buddha-Nigama: "Buddhadasa is well known for the readiness with which he gives non-literal interpretations to the buddhist texts. Giving more weight to meditative experience and everyday observation than to philology, he finds meaning in otherwise obscure points of doctrine." The lectures deal with the fundamentals of Buddhism, such as the ultimate nature of things and experience, insight, and emancipation.
Food for the Heart: The Collected Teachings of Ajahn ChahFood for the Heart: The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah by Ajahn Chah.
Renowned for the beauty and simplicity of his teachings, Ajahn Chah was one of Thailand's most well-known meditation teachers. His charisma and wisdom influenced many American and European seekers, and helped shape the American Vipassana community. This collection brings together Ajahn Chah's most powerful teachings on meditation, liberation from suffering, calming the mind, enlightenment and the "living dhamma". Western teachers such as Ram Dass and Jack Kornfield have extolled Chah's teachings for years and now readers can experience them directly in this book.
A Still Forest Pool: The Insight Meditation of Achaan ChahA Still Forest Pool: The Insight Meditation of Achaan Chah by Ajahn Chah.
Buddhist master Achaan Chah spent years meditating in a forest monastery of Thailand. This remarkable book reflects his simple and powerful message as well as the quiet, joyful Buddhist practice of dhudanga, or "everyday mindfulness," with profound insights for the West.
The Noble Eightfold Path: Way to the End of SufferingThe Noble Eightfold Path: Way to the End of Suffering by Bhikkhu Bodhi.
This book offers a clear, concise account of the Eightfold Path prescribed to uproot and eliminate the deep underlying cause of suffering-ignorance. Each step of the path is believed to cultivate wisdom through mental training, and includes an enlightened and peaceful middle path that avoids extremes. The theoretical as well as practical angles of each of the paths - right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration - are illustrated through examples from contemporary life.
BuddhadhammaBuddhadhamma by Prayudh Payutto.
Written by one of the most highly regarded monk-scholars, this book is distillation of the pivotal doctrines in the Pali Buddhist canon. Many scholars of Buddhism have said that if a person is not able to read the whole Pali Buddhist canon, then read this one book. The major contributions is a detailed description of the Buddhist principles of causality. The book explains the rational basis of the Buddhist worldview and contains a lucid discussion of the Buddhist notion of no-self. The book represents a contemporary transformation of classical Theravada thought and practice.
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