Buddha developed a profound and detailed, universal theory of unity, which accounts for everything related to mind and consciousness. The Buddha obtained his deep insights by means of mental techniques and training. Using his own mind as both research equipment and research object, his approach was at least as empirical - i.e. verifiable by experience or experiment - as that of modern physics.

Contemporary, mainstream quantum physics and cosmology in unison are close at what is dubbed a "Grand Unification Theory" which supposedly explains all phenomena and is based on empirical evidences gathered in a handful of High-Energy Physics Laboratories. Well, rather, they were close at it by the end of the 20.th century whereafter the quest for a unified theory, prevalent in main-stream physics for most of the 20'th century, seems to have dissolved into a plethora of theoretical speculations, which seem to have in common that they are un-verifiable by experience or experiment and thus are neither empirical nor scientific.

The great stumbling block for modern physics is that at the very experimental frontiers, where experiments are conducted under extreme conditions, it has been verified that the behavior of matter / energy / fields at the very smallest observable scales, ponderable in the labs, depends on how it is being observed. It is exactly here the teachings of the Buddha can come in handy. Buddha came to the same conclusions about the physical reality on the very smallest scales as modern physics. However, Buddha didn't need any multi billion dollar high-energy physics laboratory and tremendous amounts of explosive energy to make his discoveries - the shade of a tree, a pillow and a properly trained mind is all that it takes.

Regards, Project Buddha Society.


Excerpt of the Day

Each day we bring a new excerpt from our Favorite Books Online.

Excerpt from:

Mindfulness In Plain English

by Mahathera Henepola Gunaratana

There you are, and you suddenly realize that you are spending your whole life just barely getting by. You keep up a good front. You manage to make ends meed somehow and look OK from the outside. But those periods of desperation, those times when you feel everything caving in on you, you keep those to yourself. You are a mess. And you know it. But you hide it beautifully. Meanwhile, way down under all that you just know there has got be some other way to live, some better way to look at the world, some way to touch life more fully. You click into it by chance now and then. You get a good job. You fall in love. You win the game. and for a while, things are different. Life takes on a richness and clarity that makes all the bad times and humdrum fade away. The whole texture of your experience changes and you say to yourself, "OK, now I've made it; now I will be happy". But then that fades, too, like smoke in the wind. You are left with just a memory. nThat and a vague awareness that something is wrong.

Read more from Mindfulness In Plain English

Books for Sale

Heartwood of the Bodhi Tree: The Buddha's Teachings on VoidnessHeartwood of the Bodhi Tree: The Buddha's Teachings on Voidness by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.
In this remarkable book, Ajahn Buddhadasa teaches us beautifully, profoundly, and simply the meaning of sunnata, or voidness, which is a thread that links every great school of Buddhism. He teaches us the truth of this voidness with the same directness and simplicity with which he invites us into his forest - (from the foreword by Jack Kornfield).
Keeping the Breath in Mind and Lessons in SamadhiKeeping the Breath in Mind and Lessons in Samadhi by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo.
This is a how to book. It teaches liberation of the mind not as a mind-boggling theory, but as a very basic skill that starts with keeping the breath in mind. The teachings are drawn from the works of Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo, one of Thailand's most renowned teachers of Buddhist meditation.
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