Buddha developed a profound and detailed, universal theory of unity, which accounts for everything related to mind and consciousness. The Buddha obtained his deep insights by means of mental techniques and training. Using his own mind as both research equipment and research object, his approach was at least as empirical - i.e. verifiable by experience or experiment - as that of modern physics.

Contemporary, mainstream quantum physics and cosmology in unison are close at what is dubbed a "Grand Unification Theory" which supposedly explains all phenomena and is based on empirical evidences gathered in a handful of High-Energy Physics Laboratories. Well, rather, they were close at it by the end of the 20.th century whereafter the quest for a unified theory, prevalent in main-stream physics for most of the 20'th century, seems to have dissolved into a plethora of theoretical speculations, which seem to have in common that they are un-verifiable by experience or experiment and thus are neither empirical nor scientific.

The great stumbling block for modern physics is that at the very experimental frontiers, where experiments are conducted under extreme conditions, it has been verified that the behavior of matter / energy / fields at the very smallest observable scales, ponderable in the labs, depends on how it is being observed. It is exactly here the teachings of the Buddha can come in handy. Buddha came to the same conclusions about the physical reality on the very smallest scales as modern physics. However, Buddha didn't need any multi billion dollar high-energy physics laboratory and tremendous amounts of explosive energy to make his discoveries - the shade of a tree, a pillow and a properly trained mind is all that it takes.

Regards, Project Buddha Society.


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Excerpt from:

Mindfulness In Plain English

by Mahathera Henepola Gunaratana

You can't make radical changes in the pattern of your life until you begin to see yourself exactly as you are now. As soon as you do that, changes flow naturally. You don't have to force or struggle or obey rules dictated to you by some authority. You just change. It is automatic. But arriving at the initial insight is quite a task. You've got to see who you are and how you are, without illusion, judgement or resistance of any kind. You've got to see your own place in society and your function as a social being. You've got to see your duties and obligations to your fellow human beings, and above all, your responsibility to yourself as an individual living with other individuals. And you've got to see all of that clearly and as a unit, a single gestalt of interrelationship. It sounds complex, but it often occurs in a single instant. Mental culture through meditation is without rival in helping you achieve this sort of understanding and serene happiness.

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Books for Sale

What the Buddha Taught: Revised and Expanded Edition with Texts from Suttas and DhammapadaWhat the Buddha Taught: Revised and Expanded Edition with Texts from Suttas and Dhammapada by Walpola Rahula.
This indispensable volume is a lucid and faithful account of the Buddha's teachings. Dr. Rahula's What the Buddha Taught provides a simple and reliable introduction to the complexities of the subject as only could be done by one having a firm grasp of the vast material to be sifted. Authoritative and clear, logical and sober, this study is as comprehensive as it is masterly. This edition contains a selection of illustrative texts from the Suttas and the Dhammapada (specially translated by the author).
Heartwood of the Bodhi Tree: The Buddha's Teachings on VoidnessHeartwood of the Bodhi Tree: The Buddha's Teachings on Voidness by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.
In this remarkable book, Ajahn Buddhadasa teaches us beautifully, profoundly, and simply the meaning of sunnata, or voidness, which is a thread that links every great school of Buddhism. He teaches us the truth of this voidness with the same directness and simplicity with which he invites us into his forest - (from the foreword by Jack Kornfield).
Being Dharma: The Essence of the Buddha's TeachingsBeing Dharma: The Essence of the Buddha's Teachings by Ajahn Chah.
Chah offers a thorough exploration of Theravadan Buddhism in a gentle, sometimes humorous, style that makes the reader feel as though he or she is being entertained by a story. He emphasizes the path to freedom from emotional and psychological suffering and provides insight into the fact that taking ourselves seriously causes unnecessary hardship. Ajahn Chah influenced a generation of Western teachers: Jack Kornfield, Sharon Salzberg, Sylvia Boorstein, Joseph Goldstein, and many other Western Buddhist teachers were at one time his students.
Everything Arises, Everything Falls Away: Teachings on Impermanence and the End of SufferingEverything Arises, Everything Falls Away: Teachings on Impermanence and the End of Suffering by Ajahn Chah.
Ajahn Chah (1919-1992) was admired for the way he demystified the Buddhist teachings, presenting them in a remarkably simple and down-to-earth style for people of any background. He was a major influence and spiritual mentor for a generation of American Buddhist teachers. This book focuses on the theme of impermanence, offering powerful remedies for overcoming our deep-seated fear of change, including guidance on letting go of attachments, living in the present, and taking up the practice of meditation and also contains stories and anecdotes about this beloved master's life and interactions with students.
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