Buddha developed a profound and detailed, universal theory of unity, which accounts for everything related to mind and consciousness. The Buddha obtained his deep insights by means of mental techniques and training. Using his own mind as both research equipment and research object, his approach was at least as empirical - i.e. verifiable by experience or experiment - as that of modern physics.

Contemporary, mainstream quantum physics and cosmology in unison are close at what is dubbed a "Grand Unification Theory" which supposedly explains all phenomena and is based on empirical evidences gathered in a handful of High-Energy Physics Laboratories. Well, rather, they were close at it by the end of the 20.th century whereafter the quest for a unified theory, prevalent in main-stream physics for most of the 20'th century, seems to have dissolved into a plethora of theoretical speculations, which seem to have in common that they are un-verifiable by experience or experiment and thus are neither empirical nor scientific.

The great stumbling block for modern physics is that at the very experimental frontiers, where experiments are conducted under extreme conditions, it has been verified that the behavior of matter / energy / fields at the very smallest observable scales, ponderable in the labs, depends on how it is being observed. It is exactly here the teachings of the Buddha can come in handy. Buddha came to the same conclusions about the physical reality on the very smallest scales as modern physics. However, Buddha didn't need any multi billion dollar high-energy physics laboratory and tremendous amounts of explosive energy to make his discoveries - the shade of a tree, a pillow and a properly trained mind is all that it takes.

Regards, Project Buddha Society.


Excerpt of the Day

Each day we bring a new excerpt from our Favorite Books Online.

Excerpt from:

The Noble Eightfold Path

by Bhikkhu Bodhi

To eliminate ignorance we need wisdom, but how is wisdom to be acquired? As indubitable knowledge of the ultimate nature of things, wisdom cannot be gained by mere learning, by gathering and accumulating a battery of facts. However, the Buddha says, wisdom can be cultivated. It comes into being through a set of conditions, conditions which we have the power to develop. These conditions are actually mental factors, components of consciousness, which fit together into a systematic structure that can be called a path in the word's essential meaning: a courseway for movement leading to a goal. The goal here is the end of suffering, and the path leading to it is the Noble Eightfold Path with its eight factors: right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration.

Read more from The Noble Eightfold Path

Books for Sale

The Heritage of the BhikkhuThe Heritage of the Bhikkhu by Walpola Rahula.
The Heritage of the Bhikkhu is a vivid account of the Buddhist monk's role as a servant to people's needs as a follower and teacher of the basic Buddhist principles. In this fascinating and informative volume, Walpola Rahula - a noted Buddhist monk and scholar who received monastic training and education in Sri Lanka - emphasizes Buddhism as a practical doctrine for daily living and spiritual perfection, not simply a monastic discipline. The Heritage of the Bhikkhu is a pioneering work that deserves to stand with the author's earlier masterpiece "What the Buddha Taught".
A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma (Vipassana Meditation and the Buddha's Teachings)A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma (Vipassana Meditation and the Buddha's Teachings) by Bhikkhu Bodhi.
This modern translation of the Abhidhammattha Sangaha (Manual of Abhidhamma) offers an introduction to Buddhism's fundamental philosophical psychology. Originally written in the 11th or 12th century, the Sangaha has served as the key to Abhidhamma's central themes, including states of consciousness and mental factors, the functions and processes of the mind. This book presents an exact translation of the Sangaha alongside the original Pali text. A detailed, explanatory guide with more than 40 charts and tables lead readers through the complexities of Adhidhamma.
BuddhadhammaBuddhadhamma by Prayudh Payutto.
Written by one of the most highly regarded monk-scholars, this book is distillation of the pivotal doctrines in the Pali Buddhist canon. Many scholars of Buddhism have said that if a person is not able to read the whole Pali Buddhist canon, then read this one book. The major contributions is a detailed description of the Buddhist principles of causality. The book explains the rational basis of the Buddhist worldview and contains a lucid discussion of the Buddhist notion of no-self. The book represents a contemporary transformation of classical Theravada thought and practice.
Mindfulness With Breathing : A Manual for Serious BeginnersMindfulness With Breathing : A Manual for Serious Beginners by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.
What meditation method did the historical Buddha Shakyamuni himself use while beneath the Bodhi Tree. In Ajhan Buddhadasa Bhikku's book, Mindfulness With Breathing, the Thai meditation master provides practitioners with penetrating insights into the Anapanasati Sutta, the sacred canonical text which many believe is the most direct transmission of Shakyamuni Buddha's breath meditation methods. Combined with a concise translation of the Sutta itself, Mindfulness With Breathing is one of the best guides to Buddhist meditation practice available in the English language.
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