Buddha developed a profound and detailed, universal theory of unity, which accounts for everything related to mind and consciousness. The Buddha obtained his deep insights by means of mental techniques and training. Using his own mind as both research equipment and research object, his approach was at least as empirical - i.e. verifiable by experience or experiment - as that of modern physics.

Contemporary, mainstream quantum physics and cosmology in unison are close at what is dubbed a "Grand Unification Theory" which supposedly explains all phenomena and is based on empirical evidences gathered in a handful of High-Energy Physics Laboratories. Well, rather, they were close at it by the end of the 20.th century whereafter the quest for a unified theory, prevalent in main-stream physics for most of the 20'th century, seems to have dissolved into a plethora of theoretical speculations, which seem to have in common that they are un-verifiable by experience or experiment and thus are neither empirical nor scientific.

The great stumbling block for modern physics is that at the very experimental frontiers, where experiments are conducted under extreme conditions, it has been verified that the behavior of matter / energy / fields at the very smallest observable scales, ponderable in the labs, depends on how it is being observed. It is exactly here the teachings of the Buddha can come in handy. Buddha came to the same conclusions about the physical reality on the very smallest scales as modern physics. However, Buddha didn't need any multi billion dollar high-energy physics laboratory and tremendous amounts of explosive energy to make his discoveries - the shade of a tree, a pillow and a properly trained mind is all that it takes.

Regards, Project Buddha Society.


Excerpt of the Day

Each day we bring a new excerpt from our Favorite Books Online.

Excerpt from:

Mindfulness In Plain English

by Mahathera Henepola Gunaratana

You can't make radical changes in the pattern of your life until you begin to see yourself exactly as you are now. As soon as you do that, changes flow naturally. You don't have to force or struggle or obey rules dictated to you by some authority. You just change. It is automatic. But arriving at the initial insight is quite a task. You've got to see who you are and how you are, without illusion, judgement or resistance of any kind. You've got to see your own place in society and your function as a social being. You've got to see your duties and obligations to your fellow human beings, and above all, your responsibility to yourself as an individual living with other individuals. And you've got to see all of that clearly and as a unit, a single gestalt of interrelationship. It sounds complex, but it often occurs in a single instant. Mental culture through meditation is without rival in helping you achieve this sort of understanding and serene happiness.

Read more from Mindfulness In Plain English

Books for Sale

Handbook For MankindHandbook For Mankind by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.
These lectures were originally presented in 1956. From the foreword by Buddha-Nigama: "Buddhadasa is well known for the readiness with which he gives non-literal interpretations to the buddhist texts. Giving more weight to meditative experience and everyday observation than to philology, he finds meaning in otherwise obscure points of doctrine." The lectures deal with the fundamentals of Buddhism, such as the ultimate nature of things and experience, insight, and emancipation.
Heartwood of the Bodhi Tree: The Buddha's Teachings on VoidnessHeartwood of the Bodhi Tree: The Buddha's Teachings on Voidness by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.
In this remarkable book, Ajahn Buddhadasa teaches us beautifully, profoundly, and simply the meaning of sunnata, or voidness, which is a thread that links every great school of Buddhism. He teaches us the truth of this voidness with the same directness and simplicity with which he invites us into his forest - (from the foreword by Jack Kornfield).
Food for the Heart: The Collected Teachings of Ajahn ChahFood for the Heart: The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah by Ajahn Chah.
Renowned for the beauty and simplicity of his teachings, Ajahn Chah was one of Thailand's most well-known meditation teachers. His charisma and wisdom influenced many American and European seekers, and helped shape the American Vipassana community. This collection brings together Ajahn Chah's most powerful teachings on meditation, liberation from suffering, calming the mind, enlightenment and the "living dhamma". Western teachers such as Ram Dass and Jack Kornfield have extolled Chah's teachings for years and now readers can experience them directly in this book.
Words of Ajaan LeeWords of Ajaan Lee by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo.
Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo, (1907-1961) was one of the foremost teachers in the Thai forest ascetic tradition of meditation founded at the turn of the century by his teacher, Phra Ajaan Mun Bhuridatta. His life was short but eventful. Known for his skill as a teacher and his mastery of supranatural powers, he was the first to bring the ascetic tradition out of the forests of the Mekhong basin and into the mainstream of Thai society in central Thailand.
The Craft of the HeartThe Craft of the Heart by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo.
This book, Ajaan Lee's first, is like a catalog; In it, he gives the full range of his teachings on the practice of the Buddah's craft, from the observance of the five precepts to the attainment of total liberation.
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