Buddha developed a profound and detailed, universal theory of unity, which accounts for everything related to mind and consciousness. The Buddha obtained his deep insights by means of mental techniques and training. Using his own mind as both research equipment and research object, his approach was at least as empirical - i.e. verifiable by experience or experiment - as that of modern physics.

Contemporary, mainstream quantum physics and cosmology in unison are close at what is dubbed a "Grand Unification Theory" which supposedly explains all phenomena and is based on empirical evidences gathered in a handful of High-Energy Physics Laboratories. Well, rather, they were close at it by the end of the 20.th century whereafter the quest for a unified theory, prevalent in main-stream physics for most of the 20'th century, seems to have dissolved into a plethora of theoretical speculations, which seem to have in common that they are un-verifiable by experience or experiment and thus are neither empirical nor scientific.

The great stumbling block for modern physics is that at the very experimental frontiers, where experiments are conducted under extreme conditions, it has been verified that the behavior of matter / energy / fields at the very smallest observable scales, ponderable in the labs, depends on how it is being observed. It is exactly here the teachings of the Buddha can come in handy. Buddha came to the same conclusions about the physical reality on the very smallest scales as modern physics. However, Buddha didn't need any multi billion dollar high-energy physics laboratory and tremendous amounts of explosive energy to make his discoveries - the shade of a tree, a pillow and a properly trained mind is all that it takes.

Regards, Project Buddha Society.


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Excerpt from:

Mindfulness In Plain English

by Mahathera Henepola Gunaratana

Life seems to be a perpetual struggle, some enormous effort against staggering odds. And what is our solution to all this dissatisfaction? We get stuck in the 'If only' syndrome. If only I had more money, then I would be happy. If only I can find somebody who really loves me, if only I can lose 20 pounds, if only I had a color TV, Jacuzzi, and curly hair, and on and on forever. So where does all this junk come from and more important, what can we do about it? It comes from the conditions of our own minds. It is deep, subtle and pervasive set of mental habits, a Gordian knot which we have built up bit by bit and we can unravel just the same way, one piece at a time. We can tune up our awareness, dredge up each separate piece and bring it out into the light. We can make the unconscious conscious, slowly, one piece at a time.

The essence of our experience is change. Change is incessant. Moment by moment life flows by and it is never the same. nPerpetual alteration is the essence of the perceptual universe. A thought springs up in you head and half a second later, it is gone. In comes another one, and that is gone too. A sound strikes your ears and then silence. Open your eyes and the world pours in, blink and it is gone. People come into your life and they leave again. Friends go, relatives die. Your fortunes go up and they go down. Sometimes you win and just as often you lose. It is incessant: change, change, change. No two moments ever the same.

Read more from Mindfulness In Plain English

Books for Sale

Journey to Mindfulness: The Autobiography of Bhante G.Journey to Mindfulness: The Autobiography of Bhante G. by Henepola Gunaratana.
From the bestselling author of Mindfulness in Plain English comes this critically-praised autobiography sure to inspire and entertain. Profoundly candid and surprisingly humorous, Bhante G's account of his life unfolds to show us a life devoted to the development of mindfulness and to the role of compassionate teacher and guide.
Handbook For MankindHandbook For Mankind by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.
These lectures were originally presented in 1956. From the foreword by Buddha-Nigama: "Buddhadasa is well known for the readiness with which he gives non-literal interpretations to the buddhist texts. Giving more weight to meditative experience and everyday observation than to philology, he finds meaning in otherwise obscure points of doctrine." The lectures deal with the fundamentals of Buddhism, such as the ultimate nature of things and experience, insight, and emancipation.
A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma (Vipassana Meditation and the Buddha's Teachings)A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma (Vipassana Meditation and the Buddha's Teachings) by Bhikkhu Bodhi.
This modern translation of the Abhidhammattha Sangaha (Manual of Abhidhamma) offers an introduction to Buddhism's fundamental philosophical psychology. Originally written in the 11th or 12th century, the Sangaha has served as the key to Abhidhamma's central themes, including states of consciousness and mental factors, the functions and processes of the mind. This book presents an exact translation of the Sangaha alongside the original Pali text. A detailed, explanatory guide with more than 40 charts and tables lead readers through the complexities of Adhidhamma.
Keeping the Breath in Mind and Lessons in SamadhiKeeping the Breath in Mind and Lessons in Samadhi by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo.
This is a how to book. It teaches liberation of the mind not as a mind-boggling theory, but as a very basic skill that starts with keeping the breath in mind. The teachings are drawn from the works of Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo, one of Thailand's most renowned teachers of Buddhist meditation.
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